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20130318
20130326
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to be to be a little uneasy. gwen: the president did? >> i thought the president seemed a little bit defensive in that press conference. >> well, he's got a lot to be defensive about when it comes to this. think of the early summer of the arab spring, the president showed up ste -- at the state department and gave a big speech about how much money the united states was going to offer to help the arab spring. i looked at how much of that money was gone. two years later, less than half. some of the proposals never even made it to congress. i think the president didn't want to risk congress voting it down the handing out $200 million and so forth, perfectly nirkse but we're not talking about what the united states did after the fall of the soviet union. not talking about the marshall plan. we're talking about tiny amounts of money for huge humanitarian problems. >> and abdullah said he expects the bill to be a billion dollars by the end of this year. gwen: really? i thought it was interesting when the president seemed to get a little bit defensive in both press conferences. asked what he was goin
testified before the arms services committee last week. this is an offensive team that the defense department would use to defend the nation if it were attacked in cyber space. joining me now from washington to discuss the developing battle ground david sanger of the "new york times." welcome. >> great to be back with you. >> tell me why security experts are saying this has become if not our biggest national security threat the one emerging with the most concern for them. >> well it's certainly our newest and it may be among the urge else as it's an issue of consider debate. it's urgent because there are cyber attacks on the united states, mostly on u.s. corporations that take place every single day. but these are mostly attacks to sweep up vast amounts of intellectual property. whether it's an automobile design, the design of a gas pipeline, could be any kind of commercial information that chinese or other companies might find useful. that isn't really at the center of the biggest national security concern. the biggest national security concern is what happens if a foreign power o
compromise with the palestinians. but within his own party, his defense minister and his foreign minister say nothing can be done with the palestinians. the other rising star, naftali bennett says that his platform is to annex the west bank and he'll never agree to a two-state solution. so the only supporters of the two-state solution are lapid and tzipi livni. the prime minister... but it's clearly any movement forward on this is going to split this government. so it was hard to see how the previous government would move forward. i think it's even harder to see how this government is going to move forward. >> brown: do you see any potential? >> i think there is some potential here. out of 68... remember it takes 61 out of 120 to have a majority in the knesset. you have 25. as martin said, they are not part of this right-of-center block which has doubled when barack was the defense minister. so you do have a group. what keeps things the way for israel to be a normal western country goes to the palestinian issue. it will be interesting to see how it turns out. martin is correct that the key po
to the president and secretary of state and secretary of defense. their view was that they would have enough troops there, that it would be relatively easier, and they still hoped that they were going to get massive amounts of other nations to come in. there was a limit to how much i could do as a civilian other than simply telling people that i thought we needed more troops, including the president. them and you have been critical of the military strut -- >> you have been critical of the military strategy, but it was you who ordered debaathification, the disbanding of the army, both of which have been blamed. >> i think the conventional wisdom was wrong on several counts. de-baathification never polled below 95%, which meant it was getting broad support from all sectors of the economy. i did make a mistake, which was turning it over to iraqi politicians. i should have turned it over to judges, people who did not have a political ax to grind. on the army, there was no question it was the right thing to do not to recall the army. we should have not said it was disbanding it. the pentagon said it wou
of the cases, doma and prop 8 have to do with same-sex marriage. they are different. explain. >> the defense of marriage act called doma was enacted in 1996. proposition 8 is a california measure enacted in 2008. both are part of what we think as a backlash to early efforts to legalize same-sex marriage. those go back further than gavin newsom in 1993 when hawaii looked like it would legalize same-sex marriage. only when hawaii looked like it would do that, congress passed doma. the section of doma that is argued next week before the supreme court says the federal government will not recognize in the many programs a same-sex marriage that is recognized by the state. in terms of estate tax and benefits, some 1,000 programs. if a couple is legally married in the eyes of its is state, it is not married in the eyes of the federal government. that is a new policy for the federal government. prop 8 only speaks to california and bans same-sex marriage in california. >> scott: vik, they are different, but intersect. we will learn about what the justices feel about doma on tuesday when they ask quest
. it will hear arguments for the defense of marriage act known as doma. we discuss the issues before the u.s. supreme court. it's the final stop on a long and winding legal road. let's begin with a look at how it all started. the week of valentine's day, 2004, newly elected san francisco mayor gavin newsom, boldly, some said recklessly orders to grant marriage
. that said, bigger problems are ahead of us. >> the 8% of defense will kick in, so there will be furloughs. >> they have delayed the furloughs because of the continuing resolution. >> that is a good point because 28% of all federal hires are we talk about how much we revere and respect and admire veterans. they are the ones that will get laid off. >> the republicans are lucky that the ryan plan does not have a chance. if the american people got wind of the kind of cuts that would happen under this budget, and most people do not pay attention to this back-and-forth, but it started to happen, they would not like it at all. you can see that in all the data. >> i hate to be critical of you -- actually, i do not really. but you missed the story on the budget. the real news is the senate offered a budget for the first time since 2009. the ipad did not even exist the last time. [laughter] that is completely dead on arrival. it is the most appalling document you have ever seen. it does not look at any entitlements. it does not have any cuts. it marches us off a cliff into greece and perhaps cyprus
to the united states to the now former minister of the defense ahead barack said this president and this administration has done more to insure israel's qualitative military edge, intel cooperation has strengthened. there's been a lot of good cooperation meeting the iranian challenge but on that public level there has been difficulty obviously there's syria, iran, and the white house is setting low expectations with the regard to the palestinian israeli peace process. >> rose: low expectations? >> low expectations on that front. >> rose: do you see it the same way? >> it's the intersection of politics and policy. barack obama has the most dysfunctional relationship with an israeli prime minister as any american president has had in the history of the u.s./israeli relations. it goes beyond begin and carter and bush 41 and the reality is that no american president for political reasons and policy reasons can afford to have this sort of relationship. a lot of it rests on netanyahu and his first incarnation. even clinton, a guy who was prepared to cut him all kinds of breaks was ann
assert american commitment to the well-being, survival, defense of israel. but when he said, "put yourself in their shoes," the palestinians, "look at the world through their eyes. it's of their eyes. that's requiring-- that is speaking very candidly on a very sensitive subject, and i commend him for it. >> woodruff: last thing i'm raise-- we only have about 30 seconds so this is tough. the tenth anniversary on the war in iraq pain very brief thought from both of you, looking back, some people are asking, was it worth it? i don't want to put you on the spot in 15 seconds, david, but-- >> i'm not sure it was worth it. i think we look back and are more modest about what our intelligence can do, more than modest about our own sort of role in the world. i think it's been a lesson in modesty, but not isolation. >> it was not worth it, judy. it was-- it was a war of aggression. it was not a war of self-defense. it was organized against a country that had never attacked the united states, that had no capacity nor intention of attacking the united states. and it-- 44,088 american families
committee of scientists in 2009 that its tsunami defenses were inadequate. the company says it was still reviewing the matter when the disaster happened. now, the tsunami flooded the nuclear plant. >> (translated): the port area was trashed. i felt something incredible had happened. >> narrator: this man is a senior nuclear engineer who still works at the plant. >> (translated): cars had been left everywhere by the wave. buildings and 5,000-ton fuel tanks were sucked out to sea. i watched them slowly sinking. >> narrator: most of the backup diesel generators needed to power the cooling systems were located in basements. they were destroyed by the tsunami waters, meaning the workers had no way of keeping the nuclear fuel from melting. >> (translated): when i heard the diesel generators were lost, i couldn't square that with reality. i was stunned. >> narrator: this is the frantically scribbled log the engineers kept on a whiteboard in the control room as the nuclear plant slid towards disaster. 1542: nuclear emergency declared. 1558: loss of water level readings. 1636: emergency core cool
.s. supreme court. it will hear arguments for the defense of marriage act known as doma. we discuss the issues before the u.s. supreme court. it's the final stop on a long and winding legal road. let's begin with a look at how it all started. the week of valentine's day, 2004, newly elected san francisco mayor gavin newsom, boldly, some said recklessly orders to grant marriage li
. as the arab uprisings convulse the president viewed a missile battery of the iron dome defense system-- heavily financed by the u.s., which knocked scores of rockets from the sky during brief november war with gaza. the president's remarks heavy with allusions to millenia of jewish history in the holy land and a nod to the broad purposes of his trip. >> across this region the winds of change bring both promise and peril. so i see this visit as an opportunity to reaffirm the unbreakable bonds between our nations, to restate america's unwavering commitment to israel's security, and to speak directly to the people of israel and to your neighbors. >> warner: he was referring to another focus of this visit: to listen to what israeli and palestinian leaders say they're willing to do to revive the stalled peace process between them. later at a press conference at the prime minister's jerusalem residence, the president was asked about yesterday's possible chemical weapons attack in northern syria. mr. obama said last year that if the regime used such weapons, it would cross a red line of its
it would trigger american involvement because america could be his last line of defense and last protection against something much worse. >> i haven't seen any hard evidence that they've been used. there have been some reports, and if they were used it seems to have been on an extremely small scale. but again, i think there's no hard evidence. might they be used? sure, desperate leaders might do desperate things if they felt there was no alternative. i don't think there's anything we can do to prevent their use, other than to threaten, as we have, if they were to be used it would cross a-- quote, unquote-- red line and have dire consequences. the real question is if they are used on any significant scale what do we do then? from what i can tell, there are large stocks disbursed on any number of missiles and arcraft so in order to prevent continued use you'd really have to take out an enormous chunk of the syrian military. that's a euphemism for going to war. it's an extraordinarily difficult scenario. one question, charlie, which i don't have an answer to is if the syrians were to use chemi
the border, increasingly hostile neighborhood and there's -- there are no number of iron dome defense systems to that can adequately protect israel, even the united states can't. so it was kind of a call to action. >> brown: it's been interesting today. yesterday we see the president telling both sides, really, that peace is still possible. i wonder if the american officials there are talking about to the what degree he really is committed to putting a renewed effort into this. >> reporter: jeff, it was so interesting because the president and his people have been so careful not to make that commitment before this trip but today -- yesterday and really today i think he did raise expectations. not that he's going to do shuttle diplomacy himself but that his administration not only thinks it's possible but more than that that it's doable and so i think they'll have to follow through. he said secretary of state kerry is going to do a lot of this and he put his hand on kerry's shoulder essentially to say "he's my man." but the people around the president say that he got indications, he thinks, de
have been. i remember a very senior defense department official, douglasfi feif, stand, in the garden of the american embassy in afghanistan within-- i dare say three or four months of thef overthrow of the taliban, so we're talk early 2002. >> and asked him what he envisaged being the maximumsa american troop strength required there afghanistan, and he said 5,000. well, we knownd now-- michael cn correct me-- it went up to whatt michael, was it, 130,000 at one point? in any case, it reached, if you will, soaf levels. but much too late.af by the time that the surge in iraq, in afghanistan came, the situation was so bad, that retrieving it was also of always going to be a very, very uphill struggle. so, yes, i think the decision to invade iraq, which withdrew so much in terms of manpower and resources from afghanistan, did have a very deleterious effect a on the american enterprise inm afghanistan. >> rose: john, i have to saypr good-bye to you because i'm going to lose the satellite and don't want to cut you in midsentence or me. it's wonderful stee you again via satellite and hope to
's bank, paid $16 billion for legal defense fees and $8 billion in settlement for cases involving regulatory avoidance. i mean, that's almost a third of their profits. if i were a shareholder, i'd say why are you spending all that money? >> it's amazing that the easiest way to avoid all this is to stop doing it, change these behaviors. mary jo white will be the new s.e.c. chairman. she's got a long history in law enforcement. she was in the private sector for many years. that's created some controversy. >> defending big banks. >> i'm going to hope with her. i think she's at the end of her career. her legacy is going to be how well she does at the s.e.c. someone like her can be the very best regulator because they know all the bodies are buried. she's not trying to cultivate a client list to go back into practice. this is the last thing she's going to be doing. but i hope she looks at the s.e.c. enforcement strategy and starts suing individuals and looks at it as a way to change behavior not just a way to rack up press releases. i think that fresh look is going to be helpful. let's
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)

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